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Emerald Harvest Consulting, LLC

Are YOU a transformational leader?

Please answer the following questions as you would respond when you are under pressure or in a stressful situation. Be as honest with yourself as possible. Resist the urge to select the ‘right’ answers 🙂

I have an inspirational vision that I frequently communicate to others to gain their alignment
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I mobilize others through a collective sense of mission
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I speak optimistically about the future and the opportunities it provides
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I set aside my personal interests in pursuit of the end goal
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I regularly challenge the status quo
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I always keep the ‘big picture’ in mind in my decision-making process
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I have high moral and ethical values and model them through my behavior
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
Many people tell me I am a role model for them
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
My values consistently drive my decision-making process
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I speak to the commonly held values and aspirations I have with others
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
People tell me they are proud to be associated with me
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I clearly communicate my values and ideals to others and engage their support of them
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I always disclose fully all relevant information and new developments even when it’s bad news
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I consistently communicate the criteria upon which decisions will be made
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I clearly explain the rationale for decisions I have made to the people affected by the decisions
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I am always open and up-front about problems that arise
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I consistently strive to develop the latent talents of and mentor the people I lead
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I express a genuine interest in people on a regular basis
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I often share my feelings about issues and situations
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I am extremely reliable and do whatever it takes to deliver on my promises
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I always maintain confidences shared with me
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I set high performance standards because I know that challenging attainable goals lead to higher performance
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I use my ability to connect with people to have them believe that there is more value to work is than gaining immediate rewards
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I demonstrate and expect innovation and a bias for action
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
I consistently encourage others to go beyond their self-interests in pursuit of the greater good
Less True – 1 2 3 4 5 – More True
Your Name:
Your Email:

Don’t Forget To…

James MacGregor Burns coined the phrase ?Transformational Leader? in 1978 to describe the ?ideal? situation between leaders and followers. Even though the term is not new, it underlying concepts remain quite valid.

Transformational leaders engage the hearts, minds and souls of people and transform them through visionary and inspirational messages. They steer the organization toward pursing the ?right? goals and encourage people to pursue those goals in lieu of their self-interests.

Transactional leaders, on the other hand, improve organizational efficiency and help their organizations achieve objectives. These leaders influence people by appealing to their own self-interests and motivating them through the use of valued rewards and punishments. They focus on the exchange of work for rewards. Effective transactional leaders find out what motivates individuals and then offer those rewards to ensure that goals are met. They will make sure employees have the resources they need to get the job done. They strive to improve performance and job satisfaction of workers. Some managers actively monitor the work as it is being done to ensure it is up to standard. Others manage by exception and use corrective action only after staff members fail to accomplish the goals that have been set forth. Some take a very hands-off approach, and unless this is balanced with strong transformational characteristics that encourage employees to take the initiative, this approach will rarely prove effective.

While organizations need both leadership styles to successfully meet their objectives, we have focused on assessing your transformational leadership characteristics.

TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERS
Transformational leaders are change agents. Transformational leaders are recognized by effective demonstration of the following characteristics: vision, values, trust & integrity, and certain motivational strategies. They have a clear VISION of where they and/or the company ought to be going. They are guided by a strong sense of internal VALUES. They communicate those values to the people they lead with the intent that those people adopt those same values as their own. Their behavior, when consistent with the articulated vision and values, evokes TRUST in the people they lead. They MOTIVATE people by inspiring them to believe that the collaborative pursuit of this vision is intrinsically more important than personal, short-term benefits that might be gained.

YOUR TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP STYLE
You probably rely on transactional means to get people to accomplish the tasks at hand. You probably operate somewhat in a vacuum, making decisions on your own, telling people what they must do and when (but not why). People around you may feel resentful, mistrustful and unappreciated. Competition within the group may be a problem as team members are probably more interested in their accomplishing their personal goals rather than those of the team or organization. They may seem to sit around and wait for you to tell them what to do.

VISION
If you scored between 18 ? 26 points on the VISION questions (1-6), you are guided by your vision, but may be missing opportunities to gather support and mobilize others committed to its realization.

If you scored less than 18 points, the future may not be clear or enticing for you or you are satisfied with the way things are. If you are reluctant or unable to share a compelling vision, it will be difficult to garner the support required to cause any significant change in the environment.

VALUES
If you scored between 18 ? 26 points on the VALUES questions (7 – 12), your behavior is generally consistent with the values you hold. People think well of you. Make more of an effort to find commonality of values with the people you work with and talk about them openly.

If you scored less than 18 points, your values are not apparent to people around you. They are probably not sure what?s really important to you. They may have difficulty connecting with you on an emotional level. Spend some time clarifying your values and practice sharing what?s really important to you with those around you.

TRUST & INTEGRITY
If you scored between 27 and 31 points on the TRUST & INTEGRITY questions (13 ? 21), you are generally open with your feelings and opinions although people may not always clearly know where you stand. They may not be sure about how you reach the decisions you do and therefore may not see the fairness of your actions. You may appear to them to withhold important information at times. Practice ?over-communicating? so that people aren?t puzzled about what?s on your mind.

If you scored below 26 points or below on questions 13 – 21, people probably believe you ?play it close to the vest?. They may be confused about where you stand on important issues. They may doubt that you really care about them as individuals and could question how fair you are. Trust that people are mature enough to handle ?bad news?. Share your decision-making process with them. If you take the risk of sharing more than you are generally comfortable with, people will see you as more trustworthy.

MOTIVATIONAL STYLE
If you scored 12-17 points on the MOTIVATIONAL STYLE questions (22 ? 25), you do a good job of appealing to people?s ?higher nature?, helping them find value in the work they do. They are sometimes willing to put aside their personal agendas and delay short-term gratification to work toward objectives you set. People are generally productive, yet you may feel they don?t quite ?get it?. Help them develop a stronger sense of pride in their work for the sake of being masterful at it.

If you scored 11 points or below on questions 22 ? 25, you may have a difficult time inspiring people to go beyond what?s minimally required. They may seem focused on their own needs and not the needs of the group or organization. The goals you set may not be challenging enough or may not feel relevant or important to the people working on them. Talk about why the goals are important. Paint a picture of the desired end state and paint them in that picture. Encourage people to take risks and be supportive when they do, even if they ?fail?.

WANT MORE INFORMATION?
If you would like to know how you can become an even more effective leader, write me at loretta@emharv.com and ask how our proven, practical strategies can help you accomplish your career goals or sign up for a no-cost e-coaching course at www.emeraldharvest.com.

“> Don’t Forget To…

James MacGregor Burns coined the phrase ?Transformational Leader? in 1978 to describe the ?ideal? situation between leaders and followers. Even though the term is not new, it underlying concepts remain quite valid.

Transformational leaders engage the hearts, minds and souls of people and transform them through visionary and inspirational messages. They steer the organization toward pursing the ?right? goals and encourage people to pursue those goals in lieu of their self-interests.

Transactional leaders, on the other hand, improve organizational efficiency and help their organizations achieve objectives. These leaders influence people by appealing to their own self-interests and motivating them through the use of valued rewards and punishments. They focus on the exchange of work for rewards. Effective transactional leaders find out what motivates individuals and then offer those rewards to ensure that goals are met. They will make sure employees have the resources they need to get the job done. They strive to improve performance and job satisfaction of workers. Some managers actively monitor the work as it is being done to ensure it is up to standard. Others manage by exception and use corrective action only after staff members fail to accomplish the goals that have been set forth. Some take a very hands-off approach, and unless this is balanced with strong transformational characteristics that encourage employees to take the initiative, this approach will rarely prove effective.

While organizations need both leadership styles to successfully meet their objectives, we have focused on assessing your transformational leadership characteristics.

TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERS
Transformational leaders are change agents. Transformational leaders are recognized by effective demonstration of the following characteristics: vision, values, trust & integrity, and certain motivational strategies. They have a clear VISION of where they and/or the company ought to be going. They are guided by a strong sense of internal VALUES. They communicate those values to the people they lead with the intent that those people adopt those same values as their own. Their behavior, when consistent with the articulated vision and values, evokes TRUST in the people they lead. They MOTIVATE people by inspiring them to believe that the collaborative pursuit of this vision is intrinsically more important than personal, short-term benefits that might be gained.

YOUR TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP STYLE
You probably rely on transactional means to get people to accomplish the tasks at hand. You probably operate somewhat in a vacuum, making decisions on your own, telling people what they must do and when (but not why). People around you may feel resentful, mistrustful and unappreciated. Competition within the group may be a problem as team members are probably more interested in their accomplishing their personal goals rather than those of the team or organization. They may seem to sit around and wait for you to tell them what to do.

VISION
If you scored between 18 ? 26 points on the VISION questions (1-6), you are guided by your vision, but may be missing opportunities to gather support and mobilize others committed to its realization.

If you scored less than 18 points, the future may not be clear or enticing for you or you are satisfied with the way things are. If you are reluctant or unable to share a compelling vision, it will be difficult to garner the support required to cause any significant change in the environment.

VALUES
If you scored between 18 ? 26 points on the VALUES questions (7 – 12), your behavior is generally consistent with the values you hold. People think well of you. Make more of an effort to find commonality of values with the people you work with and talk about them openly.

If you scored less than 18 points, your values are not apparent to people around you. They are probably not sure what?s really important to you. They may have difficulty connecting with you on an emotional level. Spend some time clarifying your values and practice sharing what?s really important to you with those around you.

TRUST & INTEGRITY
If you scored between 27 and 31 points on the TRUST & INTEGRITY questions (13 ? 21), you are generally open with your feelings and opinions although people may not always clearly know where you stand. They may not be sure about how you reach the decisions you do and therefore may not see the fairness of your actions. You may appear to them to withhold important information at times. Practice ?over-communicating? so that people aren?t puzzled about what?s on your mind.

If you scored below 26 points or below on questions 13 – 21, people probably believe you ?play it close to the vest?. They may be confused about where you stand on important issues. They may doubt that you really care about them as individuals and could question how fair you are. Trust that people are mature enough to handle ?bad news?. Share your decision-making process with them. If you take the risk of sharing more than you are generally comfortable with, people will see you as more trustworthy.

MOTIVATIONAL STYLE
If you scored 12-17 points on the MOTIVATIONAL STYLE questions (22 ? 25), you do a good job of appealing to people?s ?higher nature?, helping them find value in the work they do. They are sometimes willing to put aside their personal agendas and delay short-term gratification to work toward objectives you set. People are generally productive, yet you may feel they don?t quite ?get it?. Help them develop a stronger sense of pride in their work for the sake of being masterful at it.

If you scored 11 points or below on questions 22 ? 25, you may have a difficult time inspiring people to go beyond what?s minimally required. They may seem focused on their own needs and not the needs of the group or organization. The goals you set may not be challenging enough or may not feel relevant or important to the people working on them. Talk about why the goals are important. Paint a picture of the desired end state and paint them in that picture. Encourage people to take risks and be supportive when they do, even if they ?fail?.

WANT MORE INFORMATION?
If you would like to know how you can become an even more effective leader, write me at loretta@emharv.com and ask how our proven, practical strategies can help you accomplish your career goals or sign up for a no-cost e-coaching course at www.emeraldharvest.com.

“> Don’t Forget To…

James MacGregor Burns coined the phrase ?Transformational Leader? in 1978 to describe the ?ideal? situation between leaders and followers. Even though the term is not new, it underlying concepts remain quite valid.

Transformational leaders engage the hearts, minds and souls of people and transform them through visionary and inspirational messages. They steer the organization toward pursing the ?right? goals and encourage people to pursue those goals in lieu of their self-interests.

Transactional leaders, on the other hand, improve organizational efficiency and help their organizations achieve objectives. These leaders influence people by appealing to their own self-interests and motivating them through the use of valued rewards and punishments. They focus on the exchange of work for rewards. Effective transactional leaders find out what motivates individuals and then offer those rewards to ensure that goals are met. They will make sure employees have the resources they need to get the job done. They strive to improve performance and job satisfaction of workers. Some managers actively monitor the work as it is being done to ensure it is up to standard. Others manage by exception and use corrective action only after staff members fail to accomplish the goals that have been set forth. Some take a very hands-off approach, and unless this is balanced with strong transformational characteristics that encourage employees to take the initiative, this approach will rarely prove effective.

While organizations need both leadership styles to successfully meet their objectives, we have focused on assessing your transformational leadership characteristics.

TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERS
Transformational leaders are change agents. Transformational leaders are recognized by effective demonstration of the following characteristics: vision, values, trust & integrity, and certain motivational strategies. They have a clear VISION of where they and/or the company ought to be going. They are guided by a strong sense of internal VALUES. They communicate those values to the people they lead with the intent that those people adopt those same values as their own. Their behavior, when consistent with the articulated vision and values, evokes TRUST in the people they lead. They MOTIVATE people by inspiring them to believe that the collaborative pursuit of this vision is intrinsically more important than personal, short-term benefits that might be gained.

YOUR TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP STYLE
You probably rely on transactional means to get people to accomplish the tasks at hand. You probably operate somewhat in a vacuum, making decisions on your own, telling people what they must do and when (but not why). People around you may feel resentful, mistrustful and unappreciated. Competition within the group may be a problem as team members are probably more interested in their accomplishing their personal goals rather than those of the team or organization. They may seem to sit around and wait for you to tell them what to do.

VISION
If you scored between 18 ? 26 points on the VISION questions (1-6), you are guided by your vision, but may be missing opportunities to gather support and mobilize others committed to its realization.

If you scored less than 18 points, the future may not be clear or enticing for you or you are satisfied with the way things are. If you are reluctant or unable to share a compelling vision, it will be difficult to garner the support required to cause any significant change in the environment.

VALUES
If you scored between 18 ? 26 points on the VALUES questions (7 – 12), your behavior is generally consistent with the values you hold. People think well of you. Make more of an effort to find commonality of values with the people you work with and talk about them openly.

If you scored less than 18 points, your values are not apparent to people around you. They are probably not sure what?s really important to you. They may have difficulty connecting with you on an emotional level. Spend some time clarifying your values and practice sharing what?s really important to you with those around you.

TRUST & INTEGRITY
If you scored between 27 and 31 points on the TRUST & INTEGRITY questions (13 ? 21), you are generally open with your feelings and opinions although people may not always clearly know where you stand. They may not be sure about how you reach the decisions you do and therefore may not see the fairness of your actions. You may appear to them to withhold important information at times. Practice ?over-communicating? so that people aren?t puzzled about what?s on your mind.

If you scored below 26 points or below on questions 13 – 21, people probably believe you ?play it close to the vest?. They may be confused about where you stand on important issues. They may doubt that you really care about them as individuals and could question how fair you are. Trust that people are mature enough to handle ?bad news?. Share your decision-making process with them. If you take the risk of sharing more than you are generally comfortable with, people will see you as more trustworthy.

MOTIVATIONAL STYLE
If you scored 12-17 points on the MOTIVATIONAL STYLE questions (22 ? 25), you do a good job of appealing to people?s ?higher nature?, helping them find value in the work they do. They are sometimes willing to put aside their personal agendas and delay short-term gratification to work toward objectives you set. People are generally productive, yet you may feel they don?t quite ?get it?. Help them develop a stronger sense of pride in their work for the sake of being masterful at it.

If you scored 11 points or below on questions 22 ? 25, you may have a difficult time inspiring people to go beyond what?s minimally required. They may seem focused on their own needs and not the needs of the group or organization. The goals you set may not be challenging enough or may not feel relevant or important to the people working on them. Talk about why the goals are important. Paint a picture of the desired end state and paint them in that picture. Encourage people to take risks and be supportive when they do, even if they ?fail?.

WANT MORE INFORMATION?
If you would like to know how you can become an even more effective leader, write me at loretta@emharv.com and ask how our proven, practical strategies can help you accomplish your career goals or sign up for a no-cost e-coaching course at www.emeraldharvest.com.

“> Don’t Forget To…

James MacGregor Burns coined the phrase ?Transformational Leader? in 1978 to describe the ?ideal? situation between leaders and followers. Even though the term is not new, it underlying concepts remain quite valid.

Transformational leaders engage the hearts, minds and souls of people and transform them through visionary and inspirational messages. They steer the organization toward pursing the ?right? goals and encourage people to pursue those goals in lieu of their self-interests.

Transactional leaders, on the other hand, improve organizational efficiency and help their organizations achieve objectives. These leaders influence people by appealing to their own self-interests and motivating them through the use of valued rewards and punishments. They focus on the exchange of work for rewards. Effective transactional leaders find out what motivates individuals and then offer those rewards to ensure that goals are met. They will make sure employees have the resources they need to get the job done. They strive to improve performance and job satisfaction of workers. Some managers actively monitor the work as it is being done to ensure it is up to standard. Others manage by exception and use corrective action only after staff members fail to accomplish the goals that have been set forth. Some take a very hands-off approach, and unless this is balanced with strong transformational characteristics that encourage employees to take the initiative, this approach will rarely prove effective.

While organizations need both leadership styles to successfully meet their objectives, we have focused on assessing your transformational leadership characteristics.

TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERS
Transformational leaders are change agents. Transformational leaders are recognized by effective demonstration of the following characteristics: vision, values, trust & integrity, and certain motivational strategies. They have a clear VISION of where they and/or the company ought to be going. They are guided by a strong sense of internal VALUES. They communicate those values to the people they lead with the intent that those people adopt those same values as their own. Their behavior, when consistent with the articulated vision and values, evokes TRUST in the people they lead. They MOTIVATE people by inspiring them to believe that the collaborative pursuit of this vision is intrinsically more important than personal, short-term benefits that might be gained.

YOUR TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP STYLE
You probably rely on transactional means to get people to accomplish the tasks at hand. You probably operate somewhat in a vacuum, making decisions on your own, telling people what they must do and when (but not why). People around you may feel resentful, mistrustful and unappreciated. Competition within the group may be a problem as team members are probably more interested in their accomplishing their personal goals rather than those of the team or organization. They may seem to sit around and wait for you to tell them what to do.

VISION
If you scored between 18 ? 26 points on the VISION questions (1-6), you are guided by your vision, but may be missing opportunities to gather support and mobilize others committed to its realization.

If you scored less than 18 points, the future may not be clear or enticing for you or you are satisfied with the way things are. If you are reluctant or unable to share a compelling vision, it will be difficult to garner the support required to cause any significant change in the environment.

VALUES
If you scored between 18 ? 26 points on the VALUES questions (7 – 12), your behavior is generally consistent with the values you hold. People think well of you. Make more of an effort to find commonality of values with the people you work with and talk about them openly.

If you scored less than 18 points, your values are not apparent to people around you. They are probably not sure what?s really important to you. They may have difficulty connecting with you on an emotional level. Spend some time clarifying your values and practice sharing what?s really important to you with those around you.

TRUST & INTEGRITY
If you scored between 27 and 31 points on the TRUST & INTEGRITY questions (13 ? 21), you are generally open with your feelings and opinions although people may not always clearly know where you stand. They may not be sure about how you reach the decisions you do and therefore may not see the fairness of your actions. You may appear to them to withhold important information at times. Practice ?over-communicating? so that people aren?t puzzled about what?s on your mind.

If you scored below 26 points or below on questions 13 – 21, people probably believe you ?play it close to the vest?. They may be confused about where you stand on important issues. They may doubt that you really care about them as individuals and could question how fair you are. Trust that people are mature enough to handle ?bad news?. Share your decision-making process with them. If you take the risk of sharing more than you are generally comfortable with, people will see you as more trustworthy.

MOTIVATIONAL STYLE
If you scored 12-17 points on the MOTIVATIONAL STYLE questions (22 ? 25), you do a good job of appealing to people?s ?higher nature?, helping them find value in the work they do. They are sometimes willing to put aside their personal agendas and delay short-term gratification to work toward objectives you set. People are generally productive, yet you may feel they don?t quite ?get it?. Help them develop a stronger sense of pride in their work for the sake of being masterful at it.

If you scored 11 points or below on questions 22 ? 25, you may have a difficult time inspiring people to go beyond what?s minimally required. They may seem focused on their own needs and not the needs of the group or organization. The goals you set may not be challenging enough or may not feel relevant or important to the people working on them. Talk about why the goals are important. Paint a picture of the desired end state and paint them in that picture. Encourage people to take risks and be supportive when they do, even if they ?fail?.

WANT MORE INFORMATION?
If you would like to know how you can become an even more effective leader, write me at loretta@emharv.com and ask how our proven, practical strategies can help you accomplish your career goals or sign up for a no-cost e-coaching course at www.emeraldharvest.com.

“>

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